Propensity can be situational or habitual

In certain parts of the world, those who don’t own cars are more likely to depend on public transportation, whenever they need to be somewhere. In many cities people use bicycles. Those who do own cars may still rent a car, take the train or bus, or call a cab when they’re out of town, or if it’s too late and they’ve had too much to drink. Sometimes a sofa bought at an IKEA store may not fit inside the back of a car, in which case people either pay for it to be delivered to their home, or rent a cargo van from U-Haul. In each of those cases, their propensity is high enough to call for a service.

Those who do own a vehicle, or have a rental, depend on other services to make best use of it. They have the propensity for services such as auto insurance, express toll routes, maintenance, repair, car washes, and parking. The value of the vehicle, how often they use it, for what purposes, and under what circumstance, determines the extent to which they will make use of and pay for such services.